Investigation and Video Evidence Suggest Imprisoned Marine DID NOT Enter Mexico in Error

Marine Andrew Tahooresi Weapons
Prosecutors display weapons taken from former Marine Andrew Tahmooressi after his arrest at the San Ysidro border crossing on April 1

Former Marine Andrew Paul Tahmooressi did not enter Mexico by mistake, according to an article published Friday in the Tijuana newspaper ZETATIJUANA.

Information obtained from a surveillance camera video showing Tahmooressi’s entrance into Mexico and investigations done on both sides of the border have led to this conclusion which is included in the investigative package that has been forwarded to the Procuraduría General de la República (PGR), Mexico’s equivalent to our Attorney Generals office. According to the report, this wasn’t the first time Tahmooressi had been in Tijuana and had “personal interest” in Mexico. The statement doesn’t specify when the previous visits to Mexico occurred, however, there is a heavy Marine presence in the southern part of California with Camp Pendleton less than 100 miles north of the border.

Tahmooressi was arrested on April 1, 2014 when he crossed into Mexico carrying a loaded .45 caliber pistol, AR-15 type assault weapon and a 12 gauge shotgun, as well as extra ammo clips and ammunition for all three weapons.

He was charged with being in possession of firearms “reserved exclusively for military use” and faces from 6 to 21 years in Federal prison in Mexico if convicted.

Marine Sgt. Tahmooressi
Sgt. Andrew Tahmooressi — is being held at Tijuana’s La Mesa Penitentiary. The 25 year old Marine Corps combat veteran is being held on weapons charges. PHOTO – Alejandro Tamayo

Over the weekend, Tahmooressi was moved from Tijuana’s La Mesa prison where he had been held since his arrest, to El Hongo II, a prison located east of Tijuana near Tecate B.C. El Hongo holds international accreditation by the American Correctional Association (ACA ). Tahmooressi was moved there after medical and psychological evaluation determined he needed to be closely monitored and kept away from other inmates after trying to escape from La Mesa prison on April 8 after talking to his mother on the telephone in the prison. He was quickly recaptured and chained to his bunk as is normal after an escape attempt. He also allegedly attempted suicide with a broken light bulb.

Tahmooressi’s arrest has raised tensions on both sides of the border. As is typical in the U.S. when an American is arrested in Mexico for breaking Mexican gun and weapons laws, Groups led by the prisoners mother, Jill Tahmooressi are DEMANDING, not asking, but DEMANDING Mexico drop all charges and release the former Marine immediately. Protests have been organized outside of Mexican consulates in Miami, San Diego and Phoenix with the expected small attendance and fewer results. A petition to the White House, again demanding President Obama pick up the phone and DEMAND Tahmooressi’s release have only garnered 12,000 or the required 100,000 signatures required for the White House to even respond to the petitioners request and of course, they’re coming out from under their rocks and out of their mommies basements on social media making the same demands, even going as far as calling for volunteers to “lock and load” to secure his release.

And how dare anyone, especially a Mexican military office have the audacity to disagree with the protesters.

Gen. Gabriel García Rincón, commander of Mexico’s Second Military Zone, which includes Tijuana, said in a May 2 interview published in the Tijuana daily El Mexicano,  that Tahmooressi’s status as a veteran is irrelevant to the charges he faces. Entering Mexico with firearms is a crime  and Tahmooressi is subject to Mexican law.

General Gabriel Garcia Rincon
General Gabriel Garcia Rincon, Commander of the Second Military District which includes Tijuana said in an interview that Tahmooressi entered Mexico as an American citizen and must be subject to the laws of our country, without regard to any occupation he may have had,” said García. “Everyone must be subject to our laws without regard to who they are or where they’re from.”

 

He entered [Mexico] as an American citizen and must be subject to the laws of our country, without regard to any occupation he may have had,” said García. “Everyone must be subject to our laws without regard to who they are or where they’re from.”

“He probably didn’t mean to, but in the final analysis he broke the law and he must pay the consequences,” said García. “I don’t know the circumstances he has given, but he did bring the weapons [into Mexico].”

 

YOUR SECOND AMENDMENT RIGHTS END AT THE U.S. BORDERS

Notice the photo at this top of this article. Those are the weapons Andrew Tahmooressi had in his possession when he crossed into Mexico.

Yes, unfortunately, they’re legal in this country although I question the wisdom of allowing a combat veteran suffering from PTSD from possessing weapons of this type, weapons of war.

I also question would there be all the brouhaha over this if Tahmooressi had “mistakenly” crossed the border into Canada which has similarly strict gun laws as Mexico. I think not.

And then the question needs to be asked, if he suffers from PTSD, why is he traveling cross country, armed to the teeth for treatment? Isn’t treatment available in Florida? PTSD has been around since WWI. It was called “shell shock” back then, but the soldiers suffering from it didn’t go through life using it as a crutch, an excuse to avoid their societal responsibilities.

It’s time for people to back off and let the justice system in Mexico work as it is designed to work. The more pressure and demands that people make, the longer this will drag out. Because at the end of the day, when it is all said and done, the excuses and fabricated excuses have been told, this guy still broke Mexican law, a very serious Mexican law and will be held accountable for his actions, as he should be.
[GARD]

This post is part of the thread: US Marine Andrew Paul Tahmooressi – an ongoing story on this site. View the thread timeline for more context on this post.

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